Produce Guide

How to Prepare
Apples are incredibly versatile and can be used in both sweet and savory dishes. Whether baking them into a pie or cooking them down to make applesauce, apples need to be cored before use. Cut the apple into quarters and use a pairing knife to remove the seeds and stem. To prevent browning due to oxidation, coat the cut apple with freshly squeezed lemon juice. 

Storage
Store apples in the crisper or other cool, dark place away from other produce items. 

Recipes

To store beets, trim the leaves 2 inches from the root as soon as you get them home. The leaves will sap the moisture from the beet root. Do not trim the tail. Store the leaves in a separate plastic bag and use within two days. The root bulbs should also be bagged and can be stored in the refrigerator crisper drawer 7 to 10 days. Cooked or canned beets may be refrigerated up to one week. Fresh cooked beets may also be frozen up to ten months. Be sure to peel before freezing in airtight containers or baggies, leaving no air in the container. They may be frozen whole or in cut pieces. [source]

How to Prepare
Beets of any variety can be easily steamed and roasted for a quick, nutritious meal. To steam, slice the stems off the beats, leaving the tails in tact. Steam the beets over simmering water in a covered pot for approximately 25 minutes, or until tender when pierced. Steamed beets can be stored in the refrigerator for up to three days. To roast, toss the beets with enough olive oil to coat, spread in a single layer on a baking tray or dish, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and any additional spices, and roast at 400° F for 25 minutes until tender and browned. 

Get the most out of your share by using the whole beet -- cut off the leafy tops of the beets for use in salads and other recipes calling for dark greens. 

Storage
To store beets, trim the leaves 2 inches from the root as soon as you get them home. The leaves will sap the moisture from the beet root. Do not trim the tail. Store the leaves in a separate plastic bag and use within two days. The root bulbs should also be bagged and can be stored in the refrigerator crisper drawer 7 to 10 days. Cooked or canned beets may be refrigerated up to one week. Fresh cooked beets may also be frozen up to ten months. Be sure to peel before freezing in airtight containers or baggies, leaving no air in the container. They may be frozen whole or in cut pieces. [source]

Recipes

How to Prepare
Blueberries can be eaten straight from the pint and make for an excellent topping to finish off yogurt or oatmeal. Blueberries also add a burst of freshness and unexpected color to scones, pies, and other baked goods. Not much of a berry eater? Add some sugar to your blueberries and simmer them down to a thick jam, ready to be preserved and stored until a craving strikes in the middle of winter. 

Storage
Blueberries are highly perishable, so plan to use them shortly after pick-up. Store the berries unwashed in a container covered loosely with plastic wrap and place in an open section of your refrigerator. 

Recipe

Blueberry Ice Cream
One Minute Blueberry Cobbler (Microwaved)

With dark, leafy greens and juicy stems, bok choy is an incredibly versatile vegetable that can be used in everything from salads to stir-frys. 

How to Prepare
Wash the outer and inner leaves of bok choy under cold running water. Cut off the root at the base and separate leaves from the stalks. If cooking, add the leaves in at the very end as they cook quickly. 

Storage
Store bok choy in the crisper drawer with other leafy greens. Wash the bok choy before preparation.  

Recipes

Bittersweet & Nutty Mixed Greens
Grilled Bok Choy
Sautéed Bok Choy
Sautéed Boy Choy with Mushrooms
Sesame Bok Choy and Broccoli Stir-Fry
Steamed Asian Greens with Honey Soy Sesame Dressing
Stir-Fried Bok Choy
Stir-Fried Bok Choy with Ginger and Garlic

Braising greens are thick, dark, leafy greens, typically grown in winter. While they can be eaten raw, most braising greens are best enjoyed cooked (as the name suggests, read: sauté them), as cooking softens the flavor and texture. This class of greens includes collard greens, kale, Swiss chard, mustard greens, Asian greens (bok choy, yukina savoy, tsoi-sim, etc.) and any other edible veggie tops (e.g. beet greens, sweet potato greens, turnip greens, kohlrabi greens, etc.).

Braising greens are incredibly good for you. They're a great source of calcium, iron, folic acid, lutein, manganese, fiber, and vitamins A, C, and K. These antioxidant-rich cruciferous greens, packed with vitamins and minerals, are great for the eyes, blood, immune system, and might even help protect against certain types of cancer!

How to Prepare
Unless the recipe you're using calls for something different, in general you can follow this simple method for cooking your greens: Rip the leaves off the stems into bite-sized pieces. Chop up the stems into bite-sized pieces. Done! The logic behind this method is that stems and leaves take different amounts of time to cook to the ideal crunchy but tender texture balance point, so you want to be able to start cooking your stems a few minutes earlier than the leaves.

Serving Suggestions
Braising greens are incredibly versatile. They can be easily added to a stir-fry, sauté, soup, stew, frittata, and more! However, the quickest, easiest (and most delicious) way to cook greens is sauté them with garlic:

  • Heat a frying pan on medium heat. Pour some olive oil into the center of the pan. When the oil is hot, add some chopped or pressed garlic, and let it cook until fragrant. Add the chopped greens stems, and cook for a few minutes until they begin to soften. Add the torn greens leaves, some salt and pepper to taste, and cook under tender and ready to eat!

Storage
Braising greens should be stored like any other greens. Take off any rubber bands around the stems. For collard greens, we recommend halving the giant leaves first. Place the entire bunch (leafy end first) into a plastic grocery bag. Gently twist the opening of the bag around the stems so air flow is cut off but the greens are not squished into the bag. Store the bag in the crisper drawer at the bottom of your fridge, far away from any fruit, especially apples!

Recipes

All broccoli needs is a bit of olive oil and butter, a sprinkling of salt and pepper, and a brief stint in the oven to become a simple but flavorful lunch or light dinner. Add some red pepper flakes, garlic, or lemon juice for variation and experiment with different cooking methods like steaming or sautéing to find the texture you like best. High in fiber and vitamin C, broccoli has earned its place at the center of our table. 

How to Prepare
Most recipes call for only the crowns of broccoli, however the whole plant is edible! To prepare the stalk, thickly peel it with a pairing knife. It can be steamed, roasted, or thrown into a stew or vegetable risotto. To floret broccoli, start by slivering off the outer branches. Then, cut the center cluster of florets away from the stalk and peel them apart with your fingers. For a helpful video tutorial, click here. 

Storage
Store broccoli in a ventilated plastic bag for up to four days. 

Recipes

Sesame Bok Choy and Broccoli Stir-Fry
Steamed Broccoli and Delicata Squash with Tahini Sauce

How to Prepare
Pan-fried or roasted, brussels sprouts make for an excellent side dish. Before cooking, wash the sprouts under cool running water, removing loose or damaged leaves. Trim the root off each sprout, then slice in half lengthwise or leave whole. If cooking whole, score an "x" into the bottom of each sprout for even roasting.

Storage
Remove loose or damaged leaves from the brussels sprouts, then store in a paper bag in the refrigerator. Brussels sprouts are best within a few days of pick-up, though they will keep for up to two weeks in the fridge. 

Recipes

Brussels Sprouts with Vinegar-Glazed Red Onions
Butternut Squash, Brussels Sprout and Bread Stuffing with Apples
Crispy Fried Brussels Sprouts with Honey
Pot-Stuck Brussels Sprouts

With its overshadowing, more popular cruciferous siblings – like kale and brussels sprouts – cabbage is too often ignored. Unusual varieties such as crinkly Savoy and oblong Napa add texture and a gentle spice to common cabbage dishes such as stews and gratins. 

Health Benefits
Rinse cabbage in cold water and remove any damaged or brown outer leaves. Cut the cabbage in quarters, slicing the core from each segment. 

Storage
Store whole heads of cabbage in ventilated plastic bags in the refrigerator for up to a week. 

Recipes

Cabbage & Fennel Slaw
Cabbage Slaw with Asian Dressing
Cabbage Tomato Pasta Toss
Crispy Cabbage Wontons (Vegan)
Napa Cabbage Kimchi
Roasted Cabbage Wedges
Shredded Napa Cabbage Salad with Radishes, Golden Raisins, and Dijon Dressing
Sweet and Spicy Coleslaw
Sweet Potato & Black Bean Soup
Swiss Chard with Cabbage, Chickpeas and Garlic
Warm Cabbage and Green Beans

The carrot is more than a kitchen workhorse. Heirloom varieties in striking purples, yellows, and oranges are showstoppers on the dinner table. Braised or roasted, carrots are great on their own, though they do the job in soups, stews, and casseroles. 

How to Prepare
Wash carrots under cold running water to remove any dirt. Separate the roots from the leaves, but don't throw them out! Carrot tops make for great pesto.  

Storage
Store leaves and roots separately. Leaves should be wrapped in a clean towel and stored in the refrigerator. The roots should be stored in a ventilated plastic bag in the refrigerator away from other ethylene-releasing produce such as apples, apricots, melons, and figs. 

Recipes

Celeriac is one of the most satisfyingly delicious foods you will ever taste- especially when you remember how intimidating it first appeared. Celeriac is not the most aesthetically pleasing vegetable when it first comes out of the ground. It looks like a large, oddly shaped turnip wrapped in tangled, squished roots and a thick skin. But do not be deterred by its appearance- removing the skin takes no longer than a minute, and once the skin has been removed, you can use it similarly to how you would use a potato. Better yet, it tastes like a warming, subtle blend of celery and parsley, with the creamy texture of a potato. By the end of the week, you will also be wondering how this divine vegetable has ever been under looked.

"Greet celeriac, the unsung frog prince of winter vegetables. Pare off its warty exterior and you'll uncover the royal vegetable within: a perfect, ivory-fleshed, winter alternative to potatoes and other starches. It is surprising that a vegetable that is so delicious, wonderfully hearty and eminently storable — and makes such a boldly verdant show in the garden — is practically unrecognized in the try-anything United States." - Jack Staub, NPR

Celeriac contains incredibly high levels of vitamin K, as well as poly-acetylene antioxidants, which have been shown to lower risks of cancer. Celeriac is also rich in phosphorus, iron, calcium, copper, manganese, and numerous other vitamins and minerals. Moreover, it is said to have therapeutic effects that decrease stress and support a healthy digestive system.

How to Prepare
To trim celeriac, slice off the top and bottom of the root. Then slide a pairing knofe along down the sides, taking off the rough outer skin as you go. 

Serving Suggestions

  • Celeriac is a root vegetable that can be used similarly to a potato.
  • Au Gratin in this recipe which we promise will have you craving celeriac for months. If you are looking for something more decadent, try this recipe for Apple Celery Root Gratin with bacon.
  • In a soup: Celeriac & Roasted Garlic Soup With Parsley Oil. For a dairy-free coup, try this recipe and omit the butter or replace it with a dairy-free margarine like Earth Balance.
  • In a salad with apples and a mustard vinaigrette in this recipe.
  • For brunch in this recipe for celeriac potato cakes with garlic spinach and an over-easy egg.
  • In a gluten-free vol-au-vent (a light puff pastry shell filled with savory ingredients) with celeriac, sun-dried tomatoes, and cauliflower.

Storage
As a root vegetable, celeriac lasts weeks to months when stored in a cool environment with low humidity. If the stalks are still attached, cut them off and store them separately in the fridge. Some sources recommend storing celeriac in a loose plastic bag, but it will also last well without a bag.

Recipes

Cabbage & Fennel Slaw
Cabbage Slaw with Asian Dressing
Cabbage Tomato Pasta Toss
Crispy Cabbage Wontons (Vegan)
Napa Cabbage Kimchi
Roasted Cabbage Wedges
Shredded Napa Cabbage Salad with Radishes, Golden Raisins, and Dijon Dressing
Sweet and Spicy Coleslaw
Sweet Potato & Black Bean Soup
Swiss Chard with Cabbage, Chickpeas and Garlic
Warm Cabbage and Green Beans

Collards add heartiness and nutrients to any and all meals. Traditionally paired with pork in Southern cuisine, collards are delicious on their own and in the company of other vegetables. The greens do well slivered and cooked briefly – use the partially-cooked leaves in salads or mixed in with a grain. 

How to Prepare
Wash the greens under cold running water. De-stem the leaves by running a sharp pairing knife against the spine of the leaf. Sliver and cook the collards until tender. 

Storage
Wrap unwashed collards in a clean, damp kitchen towel and store in a ventilated plastic bag in the crisper drawer for up to a week. 

Recipes

Pot-Roasted Collard Greens
Collard Greens with Bacon

From polenta to grits to flour, corn is an incredibly versatile staple of the American diet. Though happily consumed straight off the cob after a smearing of butter and herbs, corn deserves so much more. Pair it with ripe tomatoes for a summer salad, or bake it into a pudding for weekend mornings. 

How to Prepare
First, shuck the cob. To avoid a mess of silky hairs, cook the un-shucked cob in a microwave on high for three minutes. Remove the cob from the microwave with an oven mitt, then cut off the shank with a sharp knife. Holding the uncut end, begin shaking the cob. The 

Storage
Do not store sweet potatoes in the refrigerator - it gives them a hard center and weird taste. In general, store sweet potatoes in a dark, dry, cool, well-ventilated place, away from onions. They should last several weeks at least like this, maybe even months. There are some other techniques for more long term storage as well.

Recipes

Tomato Salad with Corn, Summer Squash, and Roasted Onions
Grilled Corn and Summer Squash Quesadillas
Shaved Fennel and Grilled Corn Salad
Grilled Corn Cakes with Citrus Greens
Mexican Grilled Corn

Gelatinous, canned cranberry find their way onto numerous American tables during Thanksgiving. But fresh cranberries, packed with antioxidants and vitamin C, deserve some attention of their own. Candy them, bake them into scones, and make the most out of this seasonal treat. 

How to Prepare
Rinse the cranberries under cold running water, discarding any discolored or soft berries. 

Storage
Store cranberries, unwashed, in their original package in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. 

Recipes For Fresh Cranberries

Cranberry Apple Pie
Cranberry Buckle (see bottom)
Cranberry Orange Sauce
Cranberry Sauce
Stuffing with Sweet Potatoes and Cranberries

Recipes For Dried Cranberries

Dried Cranberry Shortbread Hearts
Kale Salad with Apples, Dried Cranberries, and Radishes
Orange & Fennel Salad

Part of the gourd family, cucumbers are known for their crispness and fresh, refreshing flavor. While perhaps most commonly used as an addition for salads, cucumbers are good on their own, in sauces, pickled, or even sautéed! 

How to Prepare
Fresh, ripe cucumbers can be eaten raw and are perfect for salads and sandwiches. Wash the cucumber under cold running water and use a vegetable brush to remove any grit, wax, or dirt from the outer skin. For a comprehensive guide to pickling cucumbers, click here. 

Serving Suggestions

  • Raw in salads: a great addition to salads featuring the mesclun mix, pea greens and lettuce from this weeks share
  • Sautéed Cucumbers: Although typically consumed raw, cucumbers can also be cooked! Sautee cucumbers with a little butter, salt and dill for a great side dish. Ready in only 5 minutes! See full recipe here.
  • Cucumber Salad: Use sesame oil for an Asian flair, or vinegar and sugar for a pickled flavor. Create a sauce and let sit for 30+ minutes in the refrigerator and enjoy cold! Try this one with sesame oil, and this recipe with tomatoes and onions.
  • Cucumber Yogurt Sauce: Great with curries or Greek dishes, cucumber yogurt sauce is a great way to mellow out spicy foods. Mix thinly sliced cucumbers with onions, yogurt and dill or mint. See full recipe here.
  • Pickles: The benefits of pickling include not just the great taste, but the fact that your cucumbers can last way into the summer! Try this refrigerator pickle recipeto get started that lets you keep your pickles for up to a month!
  • Quick Pickles: Want pickles but can’t wait that long? Try this one hour quick pickle recipe to get your fix!

Storage
Refrigerate unwashed cucumbers wrapped in a ventilated plastic bag for up to a week. 

Recipes

Chilled Cucumber, Basil and Mint Soup
Cucumber Caprese Bites
Cucumber Juice
Cucumber Mint Gazpacho
Cucumber Mojitos
Cucumber Salad with Mint and Feta
Greek Salad Sandwiches
"Not-so-Dumb" Salad Recipe with Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Onions, Avocado, and Balsamic Vinegar
Pasta with Onions, Cucumbers and Herbs
Spring Roll inspired Lettuce Wraps with Carrot & Zucchini Ribbon Pasta 
Tomato Salad with Green Beans, Corn and Bulgur

These berries of the nightshade family remain popular in cuisines around the world. Bulbous purple eggplants are the most prominent in the states, however varieties range from small and slender to mild and meaty. 

How to Prepare
Eggplants take well to broiling, frying, and roasting, and make for an excellent vegetarian main when seared on the grill. Trim off the cap and base, then peel the skin off mature eggplants (skin of younger eggplants is edible). Salting the eggplants before cooking helps to mask their bitterness. Slice the eggplants, then score the flesh with a small pairing knife. Sprinkle a good amount of sea salt over the eggplant slices, then place them on a towel-lined plate. Leave for fifteen minutes. After the slices have been salted, roast them, fry them, or place them under the broiler for a few minutes. 

Storage
Store whole eggplants in a cool, dry place for up to three days. Avoid storing eggplants in the refrigerator.  

Recipes

Baked Aegean Style Eggplant With Lentils
Beet, Onion, and Eggplant Stacks
Easy Homemade Pizza with Eggplant, Tomatoes, & Basil
Eggplant Caprese
Eggplant Cheese Casserole
Eggplant and Chard Lasagne
Eggplant Lasagna
Eggplant Parmesan Rolls with Swiss Chard
Eggplant Summer Squash Kebobs
Grilled Ratatouille Pasta

Open-Faced Grilled Eggplant Sandwich with Pesto, Tomatoes, and Fresh Mozzarella
Pasta Salad with Grilled Vegetables
Simple Baba Ganoush
Stuffed Eggplants with Garlic Sauce
Swiss Chard and Ricotta Stuffed Roasted Peppers

"Under the British name, broad beans, this springtime crop was common in colonial American kitchen gardens. It's not quite clear when or why we forgot about them, but in Tuscany, where I now live, favas are snatched up as soon as they appear, to be shelled at the table and eaten raw with young pecorino." [source]

Fava beans are a staple in Mediterranean cuisine, though they are grown all over the world. They are delicious when simply grilled and eaten with a sprinkle of salt and squeeze of lemon, but they also work well when puréed in hummus-like dips and stews. 

How to Prepare
To shell favas, open the pod and remove the beans. Then, slip the green outer shell off the individual beans. To see a video tutorial on how to shell fava beans, click here. Once shelled, the beans may be cooked or puréed. 

Serving Suggestions

Storage
Refrigerate fava beans in a ventilated plastic bag in the crisper for up to a week. 

Recipes

Fava and Pecorino Salad
Grilled Fava Beans
Cold Cream of Fava Soup
Fava Purée

Garlic scapes are the immature flower stems of garlic. Scapes are more mild than the bulbs themselves, though they still have a gentle, though slightly spicy, garlic flavor. They work well as a fresh garnish when finely diced and can be chopped, sautéed or steamed and served with a vinaigrette for a great side dish. 

How to Prepare
Some farmers advise removing the stalk tip above the flower pod before cooking with the scapes, as they are tougher and spicier. Scapes get tough if they are overcooked, so be sure to check on them as you are cooking. [source]

Storage
Store garlic scapes in a ventilated bag in the refrigerator for up to three weeks. 

Recipes

Pasta with Garlic Scape Pesto
Pickled Garlic Scapes
White Bean and Garlic Scape Dip
Frittata and Scapes with Goat Cheese

Though commonly known as green beans, these stringy vegetables come in a variety of colors –yellow, purple, and speckled green to name a few. Though varieties look drastically different, they are similar in both taste and preparation. 

How to Prepare
Snip the ends off the beans before preparation. To use in salads and other fresh dishes, green beans must first be blanched. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. While waiting for the water to boil, prepare a large bowl of ice water and set aside. Cook the green beans for thirty seconds, then plunge the beans into the ice bath and leave to chill. Pat dry, then proceed to further cook, dress with a vinaigrette ,or eat. 

Storage
Green beans are best eaten right away, though they can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to a week. 

Recipes

Green Bean & Carrot Toss with Tomatoes, Sweet Corn, & Onion
Green Beans with Pesto
Quick Skillet Garlic Green Beans
Sesame Crusted Tofu & Green Beans
Summer Minestrone
Tacos with Green Beans and Husk Cherry Salsa
Tomato Salad with Green Beans, Corn and Bulgur
Vegetable Soup with Barley and Basil
Warm Cabbage and Green Beans

In 1998, kale was considered a specialty produce item. Today, kale is sold in 50,700 stores and is heralded as a delicious, nutrient-rich leafy green. It's applications are endless, as kale can be used in everything from breakfast stratas to creamy gratins for dinner. 

How to Prepare
Before use, kale must be de-stemmed. Run a sharp pairing knife along the spine, separating the leaf from the stem (see below). For advice on how to use kale stems, turn to this guide. Wash the loose leaves thoroughly under cold running water. 

Storage
Store kale in the coldest part of the refrigerator wrapped in a clean towel. Kale wilts quickly, so be sure to use it within three to four days of pick-up.

Recipes

Kohlrabi is a two-in-one vegetable – part tender, leafy greens, and part sweet, firm root. Packed with vitamin C and potassium, kohlrabi is worth taking a second look at. 

How to Prepare
Peel off the outermost layer of the bulb with a vegetable peeler. Kohlrabi can be eaten raw, with a similar texture and flavor similar to a cross between a radish and turnip. Try using shredded raw kohlrabi with potatoes to form latkes. Once roasted or steamed, kohlrabi can be used in anything from soups to calzones. 

Storage
Separate the leaves from the bulb and wrap them in a clean towel. Store both the leaves and loose bulbs in the refrigerator. The leaves will keep for three days and the bulbs will last several weeks. 

Recipes

Grated Carrot Kohlrabi and Radish Salad
Kohlrabi Home Fries
Kohlrabi Fritters
Kohlrabi Risotto
Kohlrabi Slaw
Kohlrabi Turnip Slaw
Roasted Kohlrabi Crostini with Fresh Mozzarella, Crispy Lemons and Shallots
Sweet Potato Kohlrabi Apple Salad

Mustard greens are pungent, spicy leaves packed full of vitamins A and K. Add these greens to mixed salads for hints of spiciness, or prepare them as you would collards. 

"Related to kale, cabbage, and collard greens, [mustard greens] are the peppery leafy greens of the mustard plant and are used frequently in Chinese, Japanese, and Indian cooking. I find them less bitter than kale or collard greens, and more peppery, like arugula. Just one taste of a raw leaf and you’ll know it came from a mustard plant. Cooked, they taste a lot like spinach, but with more body. My father recently discovered mustard greens at our local farmers market and they’re his new love. I like them with a dash of dark sesame oil, but you could easily just cook them up with a little garlic and olive oil." – Elise Bauer, Simply Recipes

How to Prepare
Wash greens thoroughly before use. Smaller, tender leaves are great for salads and other raw dishes, while the larger leaves should be braised, sautéed, or steamed before consumption. 

Storage
Wrap unwashed mustard greens tightly in a clean towel and store in the crisper for up to a week. 

Recipes

Bittersweet & Nutty Mixed Greens
Curried Mustard Greens with Butter Beans
Mustard Greens with Potatoes and Shallot Vinaigrette
Simple Mustard Greens

Onions find their way into the background of many dishes, but they deserve praise on their own. Pungent when raw and sweet when cooked, almost any meal can be improved upon with the addition of onions. Yellow onions are the most widely available but they are also the strongest – look for Vidalia and red varieties for a milder flavor. 

How to Prepare
To dice an onion, slice the onion in half through the root. Cut one end off each half, leaving one in tact. Peel back the skin of the onion, starting from the cut side. Holding the top of the onion half with the palm of your hand, slice through the onion horizontally starting from the bottom and working your way to the top. Then, slice the onion vertically, then turn to slice crosswise. 

Storage
Store onions in a cool, dry place. Onions will keep for two to three months. Do not store onions in the refrigerator. 

Recipes

Native to the Mediterranean, parsnips are popular in Roman and Greek diets. With a similar texture to carrots, parsnips are commonly broiled, baked, and mashed, though they give off a unique sweetness when cooked. 

How to Prepare
Parsnips add an unexpected sweetness to stews and soups, but also do well mashed like potatoes or braised like carrots. Mix them in with other sturdy winter vegetables for a roasted vegetable melange.

Storage
Wrap unwashed parsnips in a ventilated plastic bag and store in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. 

Recipes

Cumin Rosemary Glazed Carrots & Parsnips
Honey-Ginger Carrot and Parsnip Latkes
Roasted Carrot & Parsnip Soup with Lemon Ginger Cream
Parsnip Apple Soup
Pasta with Parsnips and Bacon

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Mild and bright with the sweetness of snap peas, pea greens make great additions to salads and light vegetable dishes. Packed with extraordinary amounts of vitamins A and C, pea greens are destined to become a part of your weekly meal rotation. 

How to Prepare
Both the stems and leaves are edible. Pea greens are arguably best eaten raw by adding it to salads and sandwiches. They are also delicious sautéed with olive oil, garlic, and shallots or onions. 

Storage
Like kale and lettuce, pea greens should be stored in a loose bag in the crisper drawer of your fridge. As divine as it may taste, this delicate green spoils quickly, so it should be eaten within 1-2 days.

Recipes

Crostini with Balsamic Strawberries, Ricotta, and Pea Greens
Crostini with Scallions, Ricotta, and Pea Greens
Pasta with Sautéed Zucchini and Pea Greens
Pea Green Pesto
Pea Green Pesto from Allen Farms
Pea Green Salad with Shaved Parmesan and Lemon Vinaigrette
Roasted Fingerling Potato Salad with Pea Shoots, Pesto, and Hazelnuts
Sautéed Pea Greens
Stir-Fried Pea Shoots with Garlic

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There are several hundred cultivars of potatoes available in the states. Starchy white potatoes are the best for fluffy mashed potatoes and casseroles, while firmer new potatoes and fingerlings hold their shape when roasting. 

How to Prepare
Scrub potatoes well with a vegetable brush to remove any dirt from the skin. Remove any dark spots or eyes with a pairing knife. 

Storage
Store potatoes in a cool, dry place. Waxy potatoes should be used within a week, but starchy potatoes will last several months. 

Recipes

Radishes are found in a rainbow of colors, all crisp with a sharp bite. Radishes make great pickles and are often eaten raw with butter and salt, but are also wonderful when roasted. 

How to Prepare
Lightly rinse or wipe with a damp towel to clean the radishes and trim off the stems and tip. The peppery flavor is most concentrated in the skin and so this can be peeled or cut off if the radishes are too pungent. However, the skin is also the source of most of the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, so try preparing them with the skins on first. For added crispness, soak in iced water for an hour before use. 

Serving Tips
Red radishes can be served whole, chopped, or grated, and either raw or cooked. Here are some ideas and recipes to try: 

Storage
Store leaves and bulbs separately in the refrigerator. The leaves should be stored in a ventilated plastic bag while the bulbs are fine stored loose. 

Recipes

Unlike winter squash, summer squash such as zucchini, globe squash, and pattypan has thin skin and buttery smooth flesh. Raw squash is perfect for summer salads, and when left on the grill, sliced squash caramalizes  into crisp, golden goodness. 

How to Prepare
Scrub squash under cold running water to remove any grit. Then, trim off the base and neck of the squash before use.

Serving Suggestions
The mild flavor of summer squash allows it to blend in with almost any dish. Add grated summer squash on top of salads, in sandwiches, or mix in a pasta sauce. To coax out and enhance the flavor, season with herbs or spices. Dill, pepper, basil, marjoram, chives, and mint go especially well with summer squash, though you cannot go wrong choosing how to prepare it.

Storage
Summer squash, unlike winter squash, bruises easily and should be handled carefully. Because it is more tender than winter squash, summer squash cannot be stored long. Store in a loose plastic bag in the fridge for up to two weeks. Alternatively, blanch (optional) and free summer squash in large chunks for up to four months. While this will soften the skin too much to hold up to roasting with other vegetables, defrosted summer squash works perfectly for casseroles, breads, or baked goods.

Recipes

There are three main varieties of sweet potato produced in the United States.A favorite for mashing or roasting, the Covington has rose colored skin and super sweet orange flesh. Eat it whole with your favorite toppings or cut into wedges and bake as a side dish.The O'Henry has a pale copper skin, almost like a potato, but don’t be fooled. This tater’s white flesh is sweet, creamy and ideal for soups and stews.Japanese sweet potatoes have red skin and dry, white flesh. Roast those up with a few of your favorite root veggies for a colorful side dish.

A medium sweet potato provides about 500 percent of your recommended daily vitamin A. It also contains tons of vitamins D, C, B-6, as well as riboflavin, thiamine, folate, phosphorus, magnesium iron, niacin and calcium and zinc. Sweet potatoes are an awesome source of potassium. [source]

How to Prepare
Scrub sweet potatoes well under cold running water. Then peel them, or leave the skin on. Submerge cubed or cut sweet potatoes in cold water to prevent oxidation. 

Storage
Do not store sweet potatoes in the refrigerator - it gives them a hard center and weird taste. In general, store sweet potatoes in a dark, dry, cool, well-ventilated place, away from onions. They should last several weeks at least like this, maybe even months. There are some other techniques for more long term storage as well.

Recipes

Swiss chard, with its buttery flavor, crisp stalks, and tender leaves, is one of the most delicious local greens. Swiss chard is also one of the healthiest foods in the human diet and should not be overlooked. Skip, of Wishing Stone Farm, grows the best swiss chard you will ever experience (because with all of it's flavor and beauty, that is what it is – an experience). We are thrilled to offer this divine green again this season.

How to Prepare
Rinse chard under cold water. There is no need to dry the leaves because the added moisture will help in the cooking process. Cut away the greens from the stems and chop according to your recipe. Don't discard the stems! They have exceptional flavor and add another layer of texture to any dish. Cook stems covered for three to five minutes or until soft before adding the greens. The shorter the cooking time, the more nutrients chard will retain.

Storage
Store chard in plastic bag for up to five days. Alternatively, chard can be blanched and frozen. 

Recipes

The mild, earthy flavor of turnips make them perfect additions to any hearty winter dish. Hakurei turnips, a popular item in our shares, are small, sweet, juicy white turnips that are harvested young. They are known as "salad" turnips, rather than "cooking" turnips, which tend to be more bitter or spicy raw), and can be eaten raw alone or in salads. Turnip greens can be cooked and eaten like any other green – braised, boiled, or steamed. 

How to Prepare
Trim the ends and wash under cold water. They do not have to be peeled. The greens should also be washed.

Serving Suggestions

Storage
Remove the greens from the turnips immediately and store separately, since the greens will continue to draw moisture and nutrients from the roots when attached. The turnips can be kept in the crisper drawer of the fridge for weeks, but are best when enjoyed within one week. Store the greens in a loose plastic bag (tight bags do not allow the greens to breathe and collect moisture) in the fridge for up to 2-3 days. The greens can be kept longer, but quickly begin to wilt (throw it in an omelette and no one will notice).

Recipes

Buffalo-Style Hakurei Turnips
Glazed Hakurei Turnips
Greenhouse Salad with Hakurei Turnips
Honey Glazed Hakurei Turnips with Apples
No Room In the Fridge Curried Greens Soup
Pan Roasted Turnips
Pickled Hakurei Turnips
Radish & Hakurei Turnip Salad In Asian Dressing
Roasted Hakurei Turnips with Israeli Couscous Salad
Sauteed Hakurei Turnips and Greens
Sweet Potato Hakurei Turnip Apple Salad
Turnips in Mustard Sauce

Winter squash includes many vividly-colored, hard-shelled squashes harvested in the fall including acorn, butternut, kabocha, delicata, and sugar pumpkin. These squash generally have a mild, sweet flavor and can take a variety of spices and cooking methods. Click here for a visual run-down on the different types of winter squash. 

How to Prepare
For longer squash such as butternut, separate the body of the gourd from the neck. Peel each half using a sharp vegetable peeler or knife. If the squash is seeded, scrape out the inside and preserve seeds for future roasting. 

Storage
Store squash in a cool, dry place for up to three months. 

Recipes

Arugula Salad with Roasted Butternut Squash, Cranberries, and Candied Pecans
Classic Baked Acorn Squash
Parmesan Sage Crusted Butternut Squash Galette
Pasta with Butternut Squash
Winter Squash Butter